Three Flower Ponies Revealed in Canterlot Nights

What are we so afraid of?

What are we so afraid of?

A springtime breeze wafts through the town, bringing the sweet scent of roses, lilies, and daisies. The three flower ponies are here, bringing with them the springtime, blooming flowers, and some awesome card-based teamwork. All details and discussion after the break.

0QKKQ7K

Picture from Adam Lemuz on Facebook

Our first member of the Flowers is Lily. Lily has two pink power, for a cost of two, and no color requirement. Already that’s not bad, two cost for two power is always useful, but with THIS card we  get an additional ability. Lily allows us to retire a friend when she first enters play in order to add the retired friend’s power to Lily’s power for the rest of the turn. So that can be handy if you want to pay just two and suddenly have a very strong friend for the turn. It may seem a bit pricey to retire a friend just to give someone else a temporary boost, but this is where teamwork comes into play.

Overall, this is a solid card. Two cost for two power has been around since the beginning, and it remains as useful now as it ever was. The extra ability is interesting, although maybe a little overpriced on it’s own, as it makes you retire the friend, rather than just exhausting it.

Picture from Adam Lemuz on Facebook

Picture from Adam Lemuz on Facebook

Next comes Daisy. Daisy has an orange power of two for a cost of three AT. That cost may seem a little high, but her special ability could make up for it in certain situations. Yes, Daisy is a freebie for being retired. If you retire Daisy she simply returns to your hand, so she can just be played again in a future turn. Although, this means you end up paying three AT every time you use her ability, if you want to use it again.

The strength of this card comes when used in conjunction with the rest of the flowers, Lily can retire Daisy to boost herself, without having to lose Daisy. Additionally, as they have no color requirements, they can theoretically fit into any deck, making them fairly versatile.

Picture from Adam Lemuz on Facebook

Picture from Adam Lemuz on Facebook

Finally, we have Roseluck, the redhead rose mare. She sports a slightly higher three white power, but at an also slightly higher cost of four AT. That’s not too bad, not great, but not bad. Her ability can make her a true monster though, as whenever you retire a friend, you can take any friend (besides the one who was retired) from the discard and add it to your hand. If you’re someone who plays a lot of cards that require retiring friends, this card is a very powerful addition regardless of your deck’s color.

I’d definitely say that Rose is worth the cost, if you’re playing a Changeling Infiltrator troublemaker, for example, you can retire a friend to immediately reveal the troublemaker, and then rose can snatch a friend back from the discard. In fact, if you’re using that kind of ability a lot, rose is basically a recycling plant, you keep dropping them into the discard, and she keeps pulling them out.

The Flower Trinity are a powerful team, because their abilities mesh together, making them all very useful as a team. You can retire Daisy to boost Lily’s power, returning Daisy to your hand in the process, and because you retired Daisy, Rose can grab another friend from your discard. That’s a good cycle you could get into, especially useful late game, I feel, when you’re getting more AT every turn, and you are more likely to have a lot of your strong friends in the discard pile. And, as none of them have any color requirements, the entire trio can be added to any deck (although, it would be better if the deck matched at least one of their colors). They get a thumbs up from me, and I really look forward to using them in matches. I’m going to go take a walk outside now, and I’ll make sure to stop and smell the flowers.

Comments are closed.